A Little Matter by Neil A. Hogan. Science Fiction Weekly #20. Short Reads Series

A Little Matter by Neil A. Hogan

Science Fiction Weekly #20

Digital Format Available

When Julie sees the Guider striding towards her, she knows something is up.

And when he invites her to a safe house to reveal that he had already known about her discovery, long before she had made it, she soon discovers that all is not as it seems.

With the dark matter having left the Oort Cloud, and now heading towards the inner Solar System, it is up to Julie to decide what to do next.

But she has absolutely no idea what that could be.

Could this mean the end of the human race?

A Little Matter is #20 in the Science Fiction Weekly short reads series. A short story of approximately 4600 words.

First Interdimensional Contact by Neil A. Hogan. Science Fiction Weekly #19: Short Reads Series

First Interdimensional Contact. Science Fiction Weekly #19: Short Reads Series

Available for Kindle

The pod members on the inside of their bubble world roll back and forth in fear as the strange triangular shape breaks into their universe, and reveals something horrifying inside.

What is this long creature made of lines?

Why is it frozen in the air above them?

And what will happen if it touches the energy skin of their world?

First Interdimensional Contact is #19 in the Science Fiction Weekly short reads series. A short story of about 4500 words.

Work After Death. Science Fiction Weekly #18 Short Reads Series by Neil A. Hogan

Work After Death. Science Fiction Weekly #18 Short Reads Series

Available in digital format

Maisee has a plan to disrupt the zomboid working tradition in the tea plantations of the South, and enlists her dead husband to help. She wants the townsfolk to believe that selling their dead relatives to be reanimated as workers in the picking industry is a really bad idea.

But there is a bigger underlying plan that Maisee is unaware of.

Can she escape an A.I. that is always one step ahead?

Work After Death is #18 in the Science Fiction Weekly short reads series. A short story of approximately 5300 words.

Science Fiction Anthology Series Alien Dimensions Issue #13 is due to be retired

Science Fiction Anthology Series Alien Dimensions Issue #13 is due to be retired


Digital | Print

In October 2016 the first issue of Alien Dimensions was released. October was chosen with the idea that, if the series kept going monthly, then in October 2017 issue #13 could be released to have the number 13 associated with Halloween. Also, it was expected that the actor to play the 13th Doctor would be announced by that time, and some stories for the issue were commissioned months in advance. In that sense, Alien Dimensions Issue #13 took a year of planning!

When Jodie Whittaker was announced to be the first female Doctor in July 2017, commissioned and submitting writers were encouraged to write either strong female leads playing doctor-esque characters, or a story with a Halloween theme or both. So, Issue #13 has a bit of both! (It was also the First Anniversary issue, so a bit longer than usual.)

Issue #13 will be removed from sale within a few days, so if you haven’t had a chance to get it, here are the details and the links:

Inside issue #13
Aura Who by Aric Merchant
One to the Left by Isaac Teile
Charger Nine by K. L. Hallam
One Chance by Sam Honour
Under the Surface by Alison McBain
Rejuvenation by Neil A. Hogan
Promises Kept by Patrick S. Baker
Sacrifice by Nicky Martin
The Ghost Haunter by Martin Roy Hill

Available in Digital and in Print formats

Speaking of Anniversaries

If you haven’t already, please check out Alien Dimensions Issue #16. Our 2nd anniversary issue. Find out more here: Digital | Print
Also available from Kindle Unlimited

Many thanks for reading.

Neil A. Hogan

Still in Beta. Science Fiction Weekly Short Story #17: Short Reads Series

Still in Beta. Science Fiction Weekly Short Story #17: Short Reads Series

Available in digital format and via Kindle Unlimited

While experimenting on himself to raise his brain waves frequencies to see the areas of reality that a normal human cannot perceive, a scientist discovers something completely unexpected.

Something that could affect the entire human race now and forever.

‘Still in Beta’ is #17 in the Science Fiction Weekly Short Reads Series. A short science fiction story of about 5500 words

Oh My God. It’s Full of Stars. By Neil A. Hogan. Science Fiction Weekly Short Story #16

Oh My God. It’s Full of Stars. By Neil A. Hogan. Science Fiction Weekly Short Story #16

Available from Amazon: Oh My God. It’s Full of Stars.

When Captain Dhead’s ship appears near a black hole binary system, his alien first officer Khyrks eagerly tells him that there is treasure in a tear in space-time, right in the center.

Slightly uneasy at being in such a dangerous part of space, Dhead sends a drone into the tear to investigate.

And finds something incredible.

‘Oh My God. It’s Full of Stars’ is #16 in the Science Fiction Weekly Series. A short reads story of about 4200 words.

When is the best time to write science fiction?

When is the best time to write science fiction?

100,000 words a month is your minimum goal

I thought for many newbies out there that this question might be something to consider. If you’re not yet at the stage of writing 100,000 words a month (that you can use, not including discarded words) then you might still be struggling with just being able to write, let alone when.

Professional authors who make a living from ‘pages-read’ on Amazon would have to meet at least that target every month to pay the bills. Then again, if you work in any administrative capacity, that would be how many words you would write in emails and documents every month as a matter of course. Why not do it full time writing on something you love?

So, assuming that your goal is to eventually get to 100,000 publishable words a month, when is your most productive time of the day?

Circadian Rhythm

Now we get into some interesting aspects of the circadian rhythm. Not just on your energy levels, but the chemicals in your system and your state of mind, also.

It was recently proven that human beings generally have an emotional rhythm too. We’re a lot more analytical, focused and reasoning in the morning, and a lot more emotional, unfocused and unreasoning in the evening. That means that there are at least two sides to every human being on the planet! [Study of 800 million tweets finds daily cycles of thought]

Emotional in the evening, emotionless in the morning. It probably explains some one-night-stands leaving before their hookup wakes up!

And so, if we have two noticeably different states of being day to day, how will this affect our writing, and when is the best time to write what we want to write?

Morning for…

If you need to do some major editing, cutting out paragraphs, soul searching about bits you love but aren’t suitable and bits you hate that need more work, then the morning is the best time for your analysis. I would say 6am to 10am could be your peak writing period, depending on your other responsibilities.

If you’re able to write focused, with minimum breaks, delaying breakfast, then your most productive time (productivity as measured by an editor) would be that four-hour period in the early morning.

For me, it’s not. My most productive period is between 2am and 6am, but these aren’t times suitable for the average person.

Now, just think. If your goal is 100,000 words per month, and you write at 60 words a minute, that’s 3600 words per hour, 14400 words per 4 hours, 100,800 per week! After you’ve spent researching, rereading, reediting and the like, you could easily do 100,000 publishable words a month.

How exciting!

But boring!

But, would anyone read it? If the morning is your best time to be analytical, is your fiction going to end up being something staid, boring, repetitive, and featuring dull characters traveling somewhere and having basic adventures before reaching their reward?

Sadly, yes!

Evening for…

Which means you need to mix it up a bit. Your more emotional side comes out more in the evening, so you may wish to plan for using that time to write your emotional scenes. You know, the ones where you’re literally crying as you write each characters’ heart wrenching discovery/situation. You can write the emotional dialogue, the terrible conflict, the harrowing ordeals in the evening where you can use your own inner turmoil to add life to your characters.

Interestingly, social media is awash with heavy emotion in just about everything. Why? Because everyone is spending time on social media during their emotional times. If we restricted social media to the times human beings were less emotional and more analytical, we’d get a lot more civil and well-thought out responses on these platforms.

Imagine the world if every aspect of our lives took into account our emotional states at certain times? Issues that needed serious analysis of the facts and limited emotional influence would only ever be discussed in the early morning. No more emotional conflicts ever!

But I digress.

Write at different times

And so, now you know. Write your emotional scenes at night and your analytical scenes in the morning. Do all your planning and editing in the morning, and fill in the gaps at night.

You’ll soon be churning out, I mean, creating compelling fiction every month to keep that money rolling in.

To your writing.

[Edit: I’ve recently read blog posts by other authors who say they aim for a minimum of 10,000 words a day. So, your ultimate goal to making a reasonable go at it as a professional author is approximately 280,000 words a month.]

Alien UFO Disclosure: Science Fiction Weekly Short Story #15: Short Reads Series

Alien UFO Disclosure: Science Fiction Weekly Short Story #15: Short Reads Series

Available in Digital Format

When Kamryn Jones’ houseboat is destroyed by a black drone, she is contacted by a mysterious woman who sends her across the country to locate evidence of a UFO. Determined to uncover the truth, she follows the trail.

But what she finds is a lot more disturbing that she would ever have expected.

And how is the President of Australia involved in all this?

Alien UFO Disclosure is #15 in the Science Fiction Weekly Series. A short story of approximately 7700 words.

The Hydrofluorons of Krakon 7

The Hydrofluorons of Krakon 7

Available in Digital Format from Amazon

When a wormhole to another dimension opens up for Dravo, he is surprised to find highly advanced aliens on the other side eager for tourism.

But just being in the same room as them could kill a human being within an hour.

Can Dravo convince the Space Council that trade is still possible?

Find out more in The Hydrofluorons of Krakon 7. #14 in the Science Fiction Weekly series. A short story of about 5200 words.

Science Fiction Weekly is Back!

Science Fiction Weekly is Back!

Yes, great news! A new series of Science Fiction weekly has begun. I’ve created some new stories, and rewritten some recent stories to be released on a weekly basis from this week!

Stories 1-13 were released last year, and I’ll release stories 14-26 this year.

The first story in the new series is out – #14 The Hydrofluorons of Krakon 7, with #15 Alien UFO Disclosure to follow next Tuesday.

I’ll post each time a new one becomes available.

Many thanks for reading!